CLO Community Leadership Summit and Nonprofit Expo: Rachel Egboro, The Storyline Collective and The Whole Story

On Saturday, April 15, 2017, the Community Leadership and Outreach Committee will be hosting the first ever Community Leadership Summit and Nonprofit Expo. The purpose of the Community Leadership Summit and Nonprofit Expo is to provide training for ladies that are interested in pursuing roles in community leadership and to create opportunities for them to practice those skills.

Rachel EgboroAmong the fabulous presenters that will be featured at the Community Leadership Summit is Rachel Egboro, whose passion for the community has inspired her to create spaces for others to find their voice through storytelling. For the past four years, Rachel worked as a Community Outreach Coordinator at First Things First. In this role, she has raised awareness about the importance of early childhood development and education. Rachel is excited to continue raising support for the next generation of Arizonans in her new role as the Strategic Partnerships and Development Manager.

Rachel is also the brains behind a new storytelling event called The Whole Story.  Rachel isn’t new to the Phoenix storytelling scene as she’s co-produced live events with The Storyline. However, The Whole Story is Rachel’s response to the events that have occurred over the past couple of years. She saw a need to create a space where every day experiences of black people in Arizona could be told.  The show debuted to a sold-out crowd and coincided with the final weekend of the groundbreaking Kehinde Wiley exhibit at the Phoenix Art Museum. Rachel hopes that The Whole Story will provide an opportunity for the community to come together and will inspire conversations for the future.

Speaking of the future, Rachel is hosting a series of workshops called Telling The Whole Story for people of all ages who are interested in telling their story on stage. Rachel is passionate about intergenerational sharing because she believes wisdom comes from both the wealth of experience of older generations and the innocent curiosity of younger generations.

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Between now and April 15th, we will be posting information about the fabulous presenters that have volunteered to share their knowledge to help us be the best community leaders we can.

This event has been graciously sponsored by a number of community organizations that believe in the potential of ladies to be leaders of our community. Wells Fargo has graciously agreed to host the day’s activities at their Connections Center and the Gratitude Hour at the Wells Fargo History Museum where attendees and participants will be able to see the original Wells Fargo stagecoaches that brought the earliest financial services to settlers in the Western states. Pei Wei Asian Diner has generously agreed to provide lunch to all the event participants and presenters to ensure that everyone has a freshly made, nutritious lunch. Valley Leadership has kindly agreed to sponsor the Community Leadership Summit and Nonprofit Expo Gratitude Hour to help ensure that all our community participants are properly thanked. Lastly, the Junior League of Phoenix Foundation believed in CLO, before CLO even existed by providing the seed grant that got the Community Leadership Program started and got Summit and Expo going.

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For more information about the CLO Community Leadership Summit and Nonprofit Expo, please contact CLO at jlp.clo@jlp.org or (602) 234-3388 x228.

CLO Community Leadership Summit and Nonprofit Expo: Rebecca Clyde, Ideas Collide

On Saturday, April 15, 2017, the Community Leadership and Outreach Committee will be hosting the first ever Community Leadership Summit and Nonprofit Expo. The purpose of the Community Leadership Summit and Nonprofit Expo is to provide training for the ladies that are interested in pursuing roles in community leadership and to create opportunities for them to practice those skills.

Rebecca ClydeAmong our fabulous presenters will be featured Rebecca Clyde of Ideas Collide. Rebecca is the CXO of Ideas Collide and founder of an early stage chatbot startup, Botco.ai. She leads Ideas Collide’s technology industry practice, innovation and marketing automation strategies. Prior to founding Ideas Collide, Rebecca was responsible for managing Intel’s embedded brand. During her time at Intel, she launched more than 50 Intel products, managed campaigns across multiple media channels and developed a public relations program that garnered unprecedented media coverage for Intel’s embedded technologies. Rebecca has been recognized on the “35 Entrepreneurs 35 and Younger” list published by The Arizona Republic and is a recipient of Arizona Governor’s Mentorship Award. She was recently recognized as the 2016 ATHENA Businesswoman of the Year in the private sector by the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce. A native Spanish speaker, Rebecca was born in Costa Rica and spent her formative years in Chile, Argentina and Paraguay. She holds an MBA from the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University and a B.A. in communications from Brigham Young University.

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Between now and April 15th, we will be posting information about the fabulous presenters that have volunteered to share their knowledge to help us be the best community leaders we can.

This event has been graciously sponsored by a number of community organizations that believe in the potential of ladies to be leaders of our community. Wells Fargo has graciously agreed to host the day’s activities at their Connections Center and the Gratitude Hour at the Wells Fargo History Museum where attendees and participants will be able to see the original Wells Fargo stagecoaches that brought the earliest financial services to settlers in the Western states. Pei Wei Asian Diner has generously agreed to provide lunch to all the event participants and presenters to ensure that everyone has a freshly made, nutritious lunch. Valley Leadership has kindly agreed to sponsor the Community Leadership Summit and Nonprofit Expo Gratitude Hour to help ensure that all our community participants are properly thanked. Lastly, the Junior League of Phoenix Foundation believed in CLO, before CLO even existed by providing the seed grant that got the Community Leadership Program started and got Summit and Expo going.

CLO logos

For more information about the CLO Community Leadership Summit and Nonprofit Expo, please contact CLO at jlp.clo@jlp.org or (602) 234-3388 x228.

JLP ROCKETS hosts 6th Annual Teacher Launch Seminar – Register now!

Calling all teachers!

Attention all Pre-K and elementary school teachers, science educators and after school program administrators in Maricopa County!  Join the Junior League of Phoenix, ROCKETS, and Miss Science™ for the 6th Annual ROCKETS Teacher Launch Seminar!

For only $10 you can get four continuing education hours while learning awesome hands-on science/STEM activities to share with your class. This year’s workshop is on March 25 at the Arizona Science Center. Sign up at: http://bit.ly/2lrhOE4.

 

Fun experiments to be conducted and different aspects of the cur

 

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Saturday, March 25, 2017, 10 a.m to 2:30 p.m.

Arizona Science Center

You are cordially invited to attend the 5th annual Teacher Launch Seminar, sponsored by the Junior League of Phoenix signature program, ROCKETS (Raising Our Children’s Knowledge by Educating Through Science). The JLP is proud to announce Sherri Smith-Dodgson, Miss Science™, will be presenting her science-based program “365 Days of Science”.

Reserve your spot now!


WHAT:
Working through ROCKETS, the JLP is hosting the 6th annual Teacher Launch Seminar at a nominal charge to 75+ pre-K and elementary school teachers and science educators and after-school program educators from districts across the Valley. The seminar is a half-day training seminar that provides non-stop, hands-on science activities that will give teachers creative ideas on how to incorporate science into everyday lesson plans. Each attendee will go home with a science kit with hours’ worth of curriculum and extension activities and supplies to help get started in his or her classroom.

WHEN:

Saturday, March 25, 2017, 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Check in starts at 9:30 a.m. Beverages and lunch to be provided.

WHERE:

Arizona Science Center

COST:

Nominal fee of $10 to reserve a spot for attendance. Credit card only purchases will be accepted.

WHY:

Numerous studies have shown that the ages between birth to eight are the most critical in a child’s development. By encouraging an early interest in science, it helps children to think critically and creatively about the world around them. The Teacher Launch Seminar was inspired on this principle with the goal of providing teachers in Maricopa County additional resources to implement fun science activities into everyday lesson plans in laying the foundation for their children’s success in school and beyond.


PRESENTER INFORMATION:

miss science.jpgMiss Science™ (Sherri Smith-Dodgson) is a STEM advocate and media personality who brings 100% commitment to any organization that she works with. As a leader in STEM education and informal learning, Sherri creates unforgettable learning experiences for students, teachers and parents. With the demand for quality STEM programs moving to the forefront of American schools Miss Science “Makes Smart Cool!”  Miss Science will be presenting ‘STEM $ells: From Polymers to Pudding’.

 

SPONSOR INFORMATION:

The Junior League of Phoenix is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women, and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers.

Sign up soon—limited seating!

“Volunteering is my passion.”

 CLO Fireside Chat featuring Katherine Cecala

“Katherine is a woman who makes her community better, she is JLP.” – Eileen Sullivan, Junior League of Phoenix Sustainer

If one is looking for inspiration this new year, President of Junior Achievement of Arizona and Junior League of Phoenix sustaining member, Katherine Cecala, is a captivating choice for a role model. On December 7, 2016, a small group of current Junior League active members were privy to Katherine’s vast wisdom and experience via the inaugural Fireside Chat series hosted by the Community Leadership and Outreach (CLO) Committee.

Katherine provided an overview of her community leadership experience and how her JLP life has intersected with and contributed to her community work. In addition to a career in NPO leadership, she has served on over 35 boards as a volunteer and has developed a reputation as a “fixer” due to her ability to take on touchy situations and turn them into positive experiences for everyone through communication and compassion.  Katherine is bold and assertive but also incredibly patient. She shared advice with members about how to come alongside people to create change within organization. The techniques Katherine shared ranged from bringing up important points three times (as it research has shown it takes people that many times to take in certain messages) to implementing employee benefits that other organizations might consider excessive to create win-win scenarios that motivated people to prioritize the organization’s long term needs over personal interests.

Perhaps most meaningful about Katherine’s story was her honesty and humility in telling it. She talked pointedly about how failures and missteps and personal struggles have intersected with and helped form her professional and community pursuits.

The small group format allowed the attendees to ask questions throughout the “Fireside Chat” and engage with Katherine personally during the mingling time before and after the “Fireside Chat”.  Individuals asked questions about fundraising strategies, people management, and work/life balance.  Additionally, attendees had a chance to mingle with each other and to further develop their network within the JLP.

In the end, the CLO “Fireside Chat” with Katherine provided interested JLP members with an opportunity to learn from and interact meaningfully with an established community leader and to explore their interest and commitment to engaging with the Greater Phoenix community to generate meaningful and positive change for the benefit of all.

The CLO “Fireside Chat” speaker series has been generously funded by the Junior League of Phoenix Foundation to increase available training opportunities for JLP members.

For more information about the CLO Fireside Chat series, please contact CLO at jlp.clo@jlp.org or (602) 234-3388 x228.

Jeannette Maré, founder of Ben’s Bells, to speak at January GMM

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Jeannette Maré, Ben’s Bells Founder and Executive Director, will lead “A Conversation on Kindness”, an in-depth discussion of the challenges and opportunities we encounter in every interaction as we strive to create a kinder community, at the Junior League of Phoenix January General Membership Meeting.

During this presentation, Jeannette will reflect on her own personal experiences with kindness in the face of devastating grief, as well as her work with Ben’s Bells Project and the power of kindness to transform people and communities. She will discuss the emerging body of research on the science of kindness.

The mission of Ben’s Bells is to inspire, educate, and motivate people  to realize the impact of intentional kindness, and to empower individuals to act according to that awareness, thereby strengthening ourselves, our relationships and our communities.


About Jeannette Maré  (pronounced mar-ay)
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Jeannette Maré is the founder and Executive Director of Ben’s Bells Project.  Jeannette’s leadership has anchored the organization through remarkable growth, including the opening of three studios, collaborating with hundreds of local organizations and recruiting over 25,000 annual volunteers. As part of her vision, Ben’s Bells has become nationally recognized and “kindness” is becoming part of the nation’s collective consciousness.
Before becoming full time Executive Director of Ben’s Bells, Jeannette was faculty at the University of Arizona teaching discourse analysis. She holds a Masters Degree in Linguistics from Gallaudet University in Washington D.C. Jeannette lives in Tucson and is grateful to have the opportunity to combine her two passions – teaching and community building – in her role with Ben’s Bells.

About Ben’s Bells Project
be kind.jpgThe mission of the Ben’s Bells Project is to inspire, educate and motivate each other to realize the impact of intentional kindness and to empower individuals to act according to that awareness, thereby strengthening ourselves, our relationships and our communities.
Ben’s Bells Project was founded in 2003 after the sudden death of Jeannette Maré’s two-year old son, Ben. The simple, everyday acts of kindness following his death helped Maré survive and begin to heal. She was inspired to establish the Ben’s Bells Project as a way to recognize and continue the kindness shown to her. On the first anniversary of Ben’s death, four hundred bells were hung in public places for strangers to find. To date more than 42,000 Bells have been hung in Tucson and beyond.
In addition to Bell distributions, Ben’s Bells Project provides kindness education programming for more than 300 schools, organizations and businesses. Ben‘s Bells is honored to be a part of the emerging field of multidisciplinary research that demonstrates the powerful effects of kindness on individuals’ long term health and on the overall quality of life in communities.

Recent research demonstrates that kindness benefits our physical and mental health, and that recognizing kindness in others increases a person’s happiness and satisfaction. But just as solving a calculus problem requires advanced math skills, the challenges of daily life require advanced kindness skills. By focusing on kindness and being intentional in our personal interactions, we can improve our ability to connect.

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Joy Burkhard. Volunteer.

Joy Burkhard. Volunteer.

 It is not unusual in The Junior League for a member to really dig into an assignment and become an expert as well as a catalyst for change in that area of focus.

Consider Joy Burkhard.

Joy is co-founder and Executive Director of 2020 Mom, a national nonprofit dedicated to closing gaps in maternal mental health care through convening, collaborating, advocacy and education. She also is a founder and Chair of the National Coalition for Maternal Mental Health and sits on the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative Executive Committee and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology working group on maternal depression.

Because of her incredible commitment to maternal mental health care, she has received the Women’s Health Emerging Leader Award from the U.S. Health and Human Services Agency’s Office of Women’s Health as well as the Volunteer of the Year award from Cigna, her long-time employer, where she is a compliance project manager. Both awards were made in 2016.

Before founding 2020 Mom, Joy had a rich volunteer life with the Junior League of Los Angeles, serving most recently as its representative with the Junior Leagues of California State Public Affairs Committee (Cal-SPAC). She was recognized by JLLA in 2013 with its Founder’s Cup award.  During Joy’s tenure with Cal-SPAC, the group championed legislation which declared May as maternal mental health month in perpetuity.

Joy’s says she was moved to action as a mental health advocate during her little brothers struggle accessing care for his mental health disorder which culminated after his suicide. She also experienced her own  anxiety after the birth of her first child and new other women didn’t have the same support and resources to get through it as she did.  The many heart-wrenching stories of loss, including the story of Jenny Gibbs, the twin of an Olympic athlete who tragically took her baby’s life and then her own, whose story inspired a young junior league member to submit the idea for Cal-SPAC’s legislation.  This coupled with her understanding of the complex health care system, need to understand root causes, and passion for improvement put her on the path to doing more.

“If I hadn’t joined the Junior League I wouldn’t be doing this incredibly rewarding and important work.  I was able to gain skills, knowledge of the problem and the confidence to do more.

My advice for other Junior League members is to look for overlap in your personal, professional and volunteer lives and take advantage of doing something when there is overlap in multiple circles.  Causes need dedicated women like us.”

You can learn more about Joy’s views on what can be done to improve maternal mental health through this YouTube video and these AJLI links (here and here).


*This article was originally published in connected, an official publication of The Association of Junior Leagues International, Inc., and has been reprinted with permission.

From Silicon Valley, a STEM program for girls

stemYou may have heard the statistics on women as STEM – science, technology, engineering and math – professionals, and they are discouraging.

Consider these findings by the United States Census Bureau:

While women’s representation in STEM occupations has increased since the 1970s, they remain significantly underrepresented in engineering and computer – occupations that make up more than 80 percent of all STEM employment. Among science and engineering graduates, men are employed in a STEM occupation at twice the rate of women. And nearly 1 in 5 female science and engineering graduates are out of the labor force, compared with less than 1 in 10 male science and engineering graduates.

Which is why a shout out to a great signature program by the Junior League of Palo Alto-Mid Peninsula is in order.

Looking for a way to celebrate its 50th anniversary, JLPA•MP developed a new community focus – “Empowering girls to be STEM leaders of tomorrow.” Obviously, this is a natural for a Junior League whose members have many ties to Silicon Valley and the communities that nurture it; but this program is much more than just a feel-good initiative in support of the dominant industry in town.

Two key elements of the initiative paint the picture.

First, partnering with San Jose’s The Tech Museum of Innovation and one of its signature programs called The Tech Challenge, an annual team design challenge for students in grades 4-12 that introduces and reinforces the science and engineering design process with a hands-on project geared to solving a real-world problem. JLPA•MP members will mentor a team of middle school girls as they train for the next challenge event. 

In addition to a $100,000 grant to The Tech, JLPA•MP is sponsoring a new program called Girls Day @ The Tech that engages girls through STEM education as well as educating teachers to support them. Girls will participate in hands-on workshops, interact with exhibits and hear from inspiring women working in tech today.

JLPA•MP is also partnering with Technovation, a global technology entrepreneurship program and mobile app startup competition for girls ages 10-18 that challenges them to create apps for the purpose of solving real problems in their communities. League volunteers will focus on increasing the number of girls participating from San Mateo and Santa Clara counties by building visibility in the community, recruiting coaches and mentors, organizing field trips to local tech companies and a regional pitch event to help them prepare for the main competition. 

To learn more about JLPA•MP’s STEM initiative, as well as the need for more STEM programs focused on girls, here is a link to an article co-authored by Gretchen Walker, Vice President of Education at The Tech Museum of Innovation, and Jan Hickman, President of the Junior League of Palo Alto-Mid Peninsula.


*This article was originally published in connected, an official publication of The Association of Junior Leagues International, Inc., and has been reprinted with permission.

Nominating Committee Announces President Elect

Wendy Brooks slated for President in 2018-20

The Nominating Committee of The Junior League of Phoenix is pleased to announce they have selected Wendy Brooks as President Elect (PE). She is slated to follow Cathy Comer’s presidency and will begin her tenure in 2018 through 2020.

Ms. Brooks initially joined the JLP in 2003 and completed one active year here. She then transferred to the Junior League of Denver followed by the Junior League of Kansas City before returning to the JLP in December, 2007.

Ms. Brooks’ area of focus was initially membership where she attended the Organizational Development Institute (ODI) track in member retention and was Vice President of Membership, along with various other leadership roles in Provisional, Placement and Nominating. Her recent focus has been on the fundraising side where she was Valley Impact Luncheon Chair and is currently serving as Development Manager.

combo_stacked_centered_webMs. Brooks has two sons, Ethan who is a senior at ASU and Noah who is in 6th grade at Scottsdale Preparatory Academy.  She works in the mortgage industry as a licensed Mortgage Loan Originator.

 

What is CSE/HT? (Hint: It involves children.)

cseIt’s a handy catchphrase for Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children/Human Trafficking, which the Junior League of Atlanta adopted as a focus area in 2013. JLA offers up these statistics to illustrate why CSE/HT is such an important issue for the League and its members:

Atlanta has the biggest illegal sex economy among eight major American cities, according to a landmark government study of the sex industry.

Nearly 100 girls are sold for sex every night in Atlanta.

Most of Georgia’s trafficking victims are domestic, meaning they are U.S. residents and, frequently, are exploited in or near their own community

The average age at which girls become victims is between 12 and 14. For boys, it’s between 11 and 13.

JLA’s campaign has three clear objectives: to raise awareness about CSE/HT within the metro Atlanta area, to directly assist survivors and those at risk, and to advocate for policy changes at local, state, and federal levels.

A key component of JLA’s strategy on CSE/HT has been working with community partners. A great example is the League’s support of Safe Harbor Yes, a non-partisan campaign focused on passing a constitutional amendment in Georgia. If approved in the November general elections, it will provide a dedicated source of funding for the intensive restorative services needed to help child victims of sex trafficking return to a normal life. In addition to JLA, the campaign’s partners include United Way of Greater Georgia, YWCA of Greater Atlanta, Voices for Georgia’s Children, the International Human Trafficking Institute, Georgia Family Connection Partnership and End Human Trafficking Now.

Another important initiative, announced in February 2016, was a major gift to JLA community partner youthSpark to help fund youthSpark’s new Youth Services Center at the Fulton County Juvenile Court, which will identify and assist exploited youth in the metro Atlanta area while also offering case-managing advocates who mentor youthSpark’s clients and service referrals to credentialed partners.

Earlier, JLA helped launch a billboard outreach campaign to provide CSE/HT victims with the Georgia Care Connection number, a resource line dedicated to helping them. The billboards also served as a way to let the pimps and johns know that the community will not be silent anymore.

But much of the League’s work on CSE/HT has been of the head-down, get-the-job-done variety.

This has involved hosting an education and empowerment workshop for adolescent girls focused on awareness and prevention and holding advocacy breakfasts for business and community leaders to show them the extent of this tragedy and its effects on business and the community. JLA has also assisted survivor organizations by providing volunteers, issuing grants, and hosting drives for items needed by these organizations

In addition, JLA is using its large membership base of dedicated and trained volunteers to build a coalition of community organizations for collaboration and shared resources across the metro Atlanta area while looking for direct service opportunities for JLA members within Atlanta organizations dedicated to ending sexual exploitation.

What JLA has done on CSE/HT shows what a single League can do to coalesce support for an important initiative. An example of what Leagues acting together, as state public action committees, came with NYSPAC’s advocacy focus in 2014 on human trafficking, which led to the passage in 2015 of the  (TVPJA). This legislation – passed in the state’s Assembly and Senate largely as a result of NYSPAC’s support – was designed to close gaps and loopholes in the state’s 2007 Human Trafficking Law and the 2008 Safe Harbor Law that is intended to protect and secure services for sexually exploited youth who are to be treated as child victims within the justice system.


*This article was originally published in connected, an official publication of The Association of Junior Leagues International, Inc., and has been reprinted with permission.